River Cane Chronicles Part III

Morning comes and with it the question: Did the dye take? Sometimes it doesn’t. But today, Jim Long is in luck. The brown-dyed cane can be seen as soon as he removes the cover. He lifts out the cane and spreads it on the concrete of his driveway. He will […]

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River Cane Chronicles part II

With the cane bundled into the tub, Jim Long fills his cut-off oil drum with water and brings it to a boil with a propane burner. He begins cutting and mixing in walnut roots from a tree that blew down near his home.The walnut will produce deep-brown strips of cane […]

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River Cane Chronicles Part I

To prepare the harvested river cane for dyeing, Jim Long – Cherokee weaver and basketmaker – cuts a six-foot long stalk in half, then expertly wields his knife to peel off strips. He gets an average of six strips for a piece of cane this thick. He then uses his knife […]

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Intro. to The River Cane Chronicles

WATR is working with  the Cherokee tribal Revitalization of Traditional Artisan Resources, aka RTCAR.  The project is called ” WATR River Cane Education & Mapping” and it extends through this summer. River cane is important to WATR’s mission because the shoots prevent stream bank erosion and trap sediments. In short, river cane helps […]

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